Posts tagged "ussc"

Osama Bin Laden is dead.

I’ve had two trips to Sydney and a trip to Wollongong since Osama bin Laden was killed, which hasn’t helped in my bid to provide a timely and thoughtful response. Rather than sacrifice the latter quality for the former, I’ve held back until today, when I had a moment to collect my thoughts and write something substantive.

I am one of those dreadful bleeding hearts who are opposed entirely to any judicial killing. My opposition to the death penalty is absolute, and its endurance within the United States is one of the country’s most ignominious qualities. If bin Laden had been captured and put on trial, I would have wholeheartedly argued against sentencing him to death. Death is part of no proper justice system. Yet I am no pacifist, and the circumstance of bin Laden’s death does not trouble me.

Much more at the USSC.

I’ve had two trips to Sydney and a trip to Wollongong since Osama bin Laden was killed, which hasn’t helped in my bid to provide a timely and thoughtful response. Rather than sacrifice the latter quality for the former, I’ve held back until today, when I had a moment to collect my thoughts and write something substantive.

I am one of those dreadful bleeding hearts who are opposed entirely to any judicial killing. My opposition to the death penalty is absolute, and its endurance within the United States is one of the country’s most ignominious qualities. If bin Laden had been captured and put on trial, I would have wholeheartedly argued against sentencing him to death. Death is part of no proper justice system. Yet I am no pacifist, and the circumstance of bin Laden’s death does not trouble me.

Much more at the USSC.


Yes, let’s invite a misogynist to the White House, a guy who’s called for violence against police officers, and called for killing the former president of the United States George W. Bush.

Karl Rove

Over at the USSC blog, I talk about how in a small way it is kinda radical to have a rapper, even if it is Common, performing at the White House.


Fast times in dropout politics

On Anthony Weiner.

No Hollywood wedding

GPOYWhatever
At the NSW Art Gallery for the USSC National Summit’s cocktail reception.

GPOYWhatever

At the NSW Art Gallery for the USSC National Summit’s cocktail reception.


politico:

It’s official.

Blogging about this at the USSC. Sadly didn’t get to mention the story of Bachmann running away from lesbians.

politico:

It’s official.

Blogging about this at the USSC. Sadly didn’t get to mention the story of Bachmann running away from lesbians.


Democrats approach negotiations with a stack of demands they expect to bargain away. Republicans go to the table with the position they intend to end up with.

Who do you think’s going to win that negotiation?

Examples: […]

Remember the Democrats’ absolute refusal to accept an extension of the Bush tax cuts that would go to the “wealthy”? Republicans drew their line in the sand on that issue -– only to have it bargained away in exchange for a tax extender bill written largely by Obama, the START Treaty, the repeal of “Don’t Ask; Don’t Tell,” a new entitlement, and a reenergized Obama administration risen from the electoral ashes.

Michael Hammond, “The Drunk On The Beltway: Two Obama Tricks That Are Going To Clean Boehner’s Clock,” RedState, June 27, 2011

Paul Krugman:

And the reason Republicans are doing this is because they must believe that it will work: Mr. Obama caved in over tax cuts, and they expect him to cave again. They believe that they have the upper hand, because the public will blame the president for the economic crisis they’re threatening to create. In fact, it’s hard to avoid the suspicion that G.O.P. leaders actually want the economy to perform badly.

The paranoia of one of these men is more justified than that of the other, but I liked the symmetry, and made it the basis of my post today at the USSC:


I don’t enjoy cricket much. I have no affection for the Australian cricket team and I rather dislike the centrality of cricket in the Australian imagination. It’s funny how these things work though; no matter my feelings for the game, I know that the three worst things the English ever did to us were to hang Ned Kelly, send us to die at Gallipoli, and USE BODYLINE BOWLING AGAINST DON BRADMAN IN THE 1932-33 TEST SERIES. (Also, the monarchy.) Which is why, to discuss the current state of negotiations about the debt ceiling in US Congress, I decided to talk about cricket:

In 1932 and 1933, the English cricket team toured Australia. The series of games between the nations would become famous for England’s bodyline bowling tactic, a strategy designed to neuter the great Australian cricketer Donald Bradman by targeting the batsman’s body rather than the wicket. (Americans: Think of a pitcher deliberately trying to hit a batter.) Bodyline was controversial enough to become the basis for a diplomatic incident between the UK and Australia, and the sentiments it stirred are aptly summed up by the words Australian captain Bill Woodfull spoke to the English tour manager Pelham Warner.
"There are two teams out there," said the Australian. "One is playing cricket. The other is making no attempt to do so."
In American politics right now, there are two parties. The Democrats are trying to govern the country. The Republicans are making no attempt to do so.
If you read this blog fairly consistently, you probably have a pretty good idea of where I’m coming from with my political views. I don’t try to hide them, but nor do I try to premium them. I usually find it more interesting to understand what is happening in America than to try to argue for my preferred policy outcomes; after all, that government is not mine. I agree with what Frank Rich wrote in his final column as a New York Times opinion writer: “I do have strong political views, but opinions are cheap. Anyone could be a critic of the Bush administration. The challenge as a writer was to try to figure out why it governed the way it did — and how it got away with it for so long — and, dare I say it, to have fun chronicling each new outrage.”
So I genuinely believe that criticizing the current Republican party is an act of analysis, not partisanship. The left, of course, does not have a problem complaining about the GOP, but thoughtful figures on the right have begun to do so as well over the past few years. Conor Friedersdorf and Ross Douthat have both voiced strong critiques of the American right. David Frum is particularly famous for his recent denunciations of the party. Andrew Sullivan and Fareed Zakaria have attacked the party’s conservatism. And now, David Brooks may be added to that list.

The rest is at the USSC.

I don’t enjoy cricket much. I have no affection for the Australian cricket team and I rather dislike the centrality of cricket in the Australian imagination. It’s funny how these things work though; no matter my feelings for the game, I know that the three worst things the English ever did to us were to hang Ned Kelly, send us to die at Gallipoli, and USE BODYLINE BOWLING AGAINST DON BRADMAN IN THE 1932-33 TEST SERIES. (Also, the monarchy.) Which is why, to discuss the current state of negotiations about the debt ceiling in US Congress, I decided to talk about cricket:

In 1932 and 1933, the English cricket team toured Australia. The series of games between the nations would become famous for England’s bodyline bowling tactic, a strategy designed to neuter the great Australian cricketer Donald Bradman by targeting the batsman’s body rather than the wicket. (Americans: Think of a pitcher deliberately trying to hit a batter.) Bodyline was controversial enough to become the basis for a diplomatic incident between the UK and Australia, and the sentiments it stirred are aptly summed up by the words Australian captain Bill Woodfull spoke to the English tour manager Pelham Warner.

"There are two teams out there," said the Australian. "One is playing cricket. The other is making no attempt to do so."

In American politics right now, there are two parties. The Democrats are trying to govern the country. The Republicans are making no attempt to do so.

If you read this blog fairly consistently, you probably have a pretty good idea of where I’m coming from with my political views. I don’t try to hide them, but nor do I try to premium them. I usually find it more interesting to understand what is happening in America than to try to argue for my preferred policy outcomes; after all, that government is not mine. I agree with what Frank Rich wrote in his final column as a New York Times opinion writer: “I do have strong political views, but opinions are cheap. Anyone could be a critic of the Bush administration. The challenge as a writer was to try to figure out why it governed the way it did — and how it got away with it for so long — and, dare I say it, to have fun chronicling each new outrage.”

So I genuinely believe that criticizing the current Republican party is an act of analysis, not partisanship. The left, of course, does not have a problem complaining about the GOP, but thoughtful figures on the right have begun to do so as well over the past few years. Conor Friedersdorf and Ross Douthat have both voiced strong critiques of the American right. David Frum is particularly famous for his recent denunciations of the party. Andrew Sullivan and Fareed Zakaria have attacked the party’s conservatism. And now, David Brooks may be added to that list.

The rest is at the USSC.



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