Posts tagged "the simpsons"

Bill Oakley: "The Lost Jokes and Story Arcs of "Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song"


Skinner: Er, one question remains: how do I get out of the army?
Bart: No problemo. Just make a pass at your commanding officer!
Skinner: Done and done!

Seymour’s gonna need a new plan.

Skinner: Er, one question remains: how do I get out of the army?

Bart: No problemo. Just make a pass at your commanding officer!

Skinner: Done and done!

Seymour’s gonna need a new plan.


"Let’s kiss boys!" 

"Let’s kiss boys!" 


Please enjoy this gif of the animated variety.


Originally aired April 30, 1992 (h/t)

"Quality, schmality. If I had a TV show, I’d run that sucker into the ground."


Record stores have always seemed crazy to me, but it doesn’t upset me. Music is none of my business.
Marge Simpson, The Simpsons, Ep.07.24: “Homerpalooza”

The episode begins with Homer in a carnivorous fury, anxiously anticipated an imminent orgy of meat consumption, and Lisa sporting her trademark look of weary resignation. Lisa always looks like she’s bracing for the next inevitable disappointment in a life of constant, persistent, low-level martyrdom.

Nathan Rabin, “The Simpsons (Classic): ‘One Fish, Two Fish, Blowfish, Blue Fish,” The A.V. Club,” November 21, 2010

This is a great observation of what made Lisa great when the show was at its peak: her carefully balanced combination of alienation, intelligence, and naïveté. It was characteristic of the show’s early cynicism — when it most reflected its Matt Groening’s worldview — that its wisest character was also condemned to being all but powerless. It’s tough to designate the smartest girl in the room as a child without turning her into a pseudo adult, and the show achieved a wonderful pathos when it was disciplined enough to keep Lisa within these boundaries.

They turned her into a pseudo adult pretty quickly, and even managed to maintain its high level of performance while doing so. But it portended poorly, and hinted at a sloppiness that would only grow over time. For Lisa, the turning point was probably Lisa the Vegetarian, where de facto adult Lisa effectively parents man child Homer. Compare to the prior Lisa’s Subtitute, where though Homer is as childish as ever, his relationship to Lisa remains firmly paternal, both in their disagreement and in its resolution.

(The other character Lisa possessed in these early years was, along with Bart, as a yellow hued Bobbsey Twin, and this worked because it kept the kids as kids; saving Itchy and Scratchy or reuniting Krusty with his estranged father might be outlandish things for children to do, but the stories are told as though they might be kid lit.)

The A.V. Club is reviewing every Simpsons episode ever, in order, and it’s some great analysis of a show about which it’s hard to find new things to say. Check it out.



Homer: Pretty soon, every boy and girl in Springfield Elementary School is going to come and see this thing.
Marge: Really? Why?
Homer: They’re forcing ‘em!

jonathanbogart replied to your post: A kinder way of looking at art subsidies.
I definitely disagree that art has any intrinsic moral value: whether someone is “bettered” (what does that mean?) by opera, art galleries, or Jawbreaker has more to do with the person than with what they’re consuming. Exhibit One: the Bible.

What I mean by “bettered” is what Homer and Marge are referring to. The nebulous, kind of alchemical idea that people benefit in non-specified ways from exposure to certain kinds of art. The impetus behind dragging school kids along to see Michaelangelo’s David on its tour of New York, Springfield, and (if they have time) Chicago, Boston and Los Angeles. 
Does this idea withstand scrutiny? Probably not! As you say, betterment has more to do with the person than the art. Even so, we shouldn’t come to the conclusion art is meaningless. Art that is made meaningful by the viewer is still meaningful.

Homer: Pretty soon, every boy and girl in Springfield Elementary School is going to come and see this thing.

Marge: Really? Why?

Homer: They’re forcing ‘em!

  1. jonathanbogart replied to your post: A kinder way of looking at art subsidies.
    I definitely disagree that art has any intrinsic moral value: whether someone is “bettered” (what does that mean?) by opera, art galleries, or Jawbreaker has more to do with the person than with what they’re consuming. Exhibit One: the Bible.

What I mean by “bettered” is what Homer and Marge are referring to. The nebulous, kind of alchemical idea that people benefit in non-specified ways from exposure to certain kinds of art. The impetus behind dragging school kids along to see Michaelangelo’s David on its tour of New York, Springfield, and (if they have time) Chicago, Boston and Los Angeles. 

Does this idea withstand scrutiny? Probably not! As you say, betterment has more to do with the person than the art. Even so, we shouldn’t come to the conclusion art is meaningless. Art that is made meaningful by the viewer is still meaningful.



eyeonspringfield:

And stay out of Riverdale!

Something about how Waka should be Photoshopped into this scene.

eyeonspringfield:

And stay out of Riverdale!

Something about how Waka should be Photoshopped into this scene.



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