Posts tagged "taylor swift"

Can’t believe it took me this long to think of this.

Can’t believe it took me this long to think of this.


Taylor’s awkwardly lengthy song introductions are better than every TED Talk anyone’s ever given tbh.


Infatuation, freedom, fast cars: automobility and Taylor Swift

  • "Just a boy in a Chevy truck that had a tendency of getting stuck on back roads at night." ("Tim McGraw," 2006)
  • "I hate that stupid old pick-up truck you never let me drive." ("Picture to Burn," 2006)
  • "He’s the song in the car I keep singing." ("Teardrops on My Guitar," 2006)
  • "I was riding shotgun with my hair undone in the front seat of his car/He’s got a one-hand feel on the steering wheel: the other on my heart." ("Our Song," 2006)
  • "2 a.m., riding in your truck, and all I need is here next to me." ("Mary’s Song [Oh My My]," (2006)
  • "Rolling her around in a truck that I bought you." ("Irreplaceable," live, 2007)
  • "You walk me to my car and you know I want to ask you to dance right there in the parking lot." ("Fearless, 2008)
  • "And then you’re on your very first date and he’s got a car." ("Fifteen," 2008)
  • "This is a big world; that was a small town there in my rear view mirror disappearing now," ("White Horse," 2008)
  • "I remember you driving to my house in the middle of the night." ("You Belong With Me," 2008)
  • "I come home crying and you hold me tight and grab the keys/And we drive and drive until we’ve found a town far enough away." ("The Best Day," 2008)
  • "I know I’m laughing on the car ride home with you." ("The Best Day," 2008)
  • "You’re in the car on the way to the movies and you’re mortified your mom’s dropping you off." ("Never Grow Up," 2010)
  • "He puts papers in his briefcase and drives away." ("Superman," 2010)
  • "I’m walking fast through the traffic lights." ("State of Grace," 2012)
  • "Loving him is like driving a new Maserati down a dead-end street." ("Red," 2012)
  • "Two headlights shine through the sleepless night and I will get you alone." ("Treacherous," 2012)
  • "We’re singing in the car getting lost upstate." ("All Too Well," 2012)
  • "There we are again on that little town street; you almost ran the red because you were looking at me." ("All Too Well," 2012)
  • "Took off faster than a green light — go." ("Holy Ground," 2012)
  • "Now it’s big black cars and Riviera views." ("The Lucky One," 2012)
  • "We walked down the block to my car and I almost brought him up." ("Begin Again," 2012)

tandess:

i am genuinely sorry about how relevant to my interests this is

I really love that Taylor copies excerpts from F. Scott Fitzgerald into her notebook and then photographs them for her Facebook and also that she writes excerpts on to a chalkboard she apparently owns as well, and I wanted to post about this yesterday, but I’d already posted about how I want Taylor Keds because Taylor posted them on her Facebook. And Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll probably shouldn’t transform into Pitchfork Reviews Reviews only with Taylor’s Facebook page*, is what I’m saying.
And also Vanity Fair needs to stop acting like Taylor didn’t quote Pablo Neruda in her liner notes or whatever.
——
*Not promising Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll won’t transform into What Taylor Does Tweets Reviewed.

tandess:

i am genuinely sorry about how relevant to my interests this is

I really love that Taylor copies excerpts from F. Scott Fitzgerald into her notebook and then photographs them for her Facebook and also that she writes excerpts on to a chalkboard she apparently owns as well, and I wanted to post about this yesterday, but I’d already posted about how I want Taylor Keds because Taylor posted them on her Facebook. And Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll probably shouldn’t transform into Pitchfork Reviews Reviews only with Taylor’s Facebook page*, is what I’m saying.

And also Vanity Fair needs to stop acting like Taylor didn’t quote Pablo Neruda in her liner notes or whatever.

——

*Not promising Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll won’t transform into What Taylor Does Tweets Reviewed.


I sorta think I should own these Taylor Keds.

I sorta think I should own these Taylor Keds.


I didn’t write this, but I am!

I didn’t write this, but I am!


lol but could you imagine being at a Taylor show and all of a sudden this random woman, teenage (?) daughter by her side, is demanding WHY ARE YOU HERE?

lol but could you imagine being at a Taylor show and all of a sudden this random woman, teenage (?) daughter by her side, is demanding WHY ARE YOU HERE?


Taylor Swift, “I’d Lie” (Unreleased, 200?)

A thing I like about unreleased Taylor songs is the way they offer glimpses into her songwriting. “I’d Lie” sounds early, and it’s clear why she never put it on an album; melodically, it includes transparent swipes from Train’s “Drops of Jupiter” (which Taylor would regularly cover on the Speak Now tour) and Saving Jane’s “Girl Next Door” (a 2005 song later covered by Julie Roberts with a similar theme to Swift’s “You Belong With Me”).

The tune is like an outline of a Taylor Swift song: there is a boy defined by a set of attributes (“And I could tell you his favorite color’s green/he loves to argue/born on the seventeenth” — note the Swift device of delivering information by funneling it through her own subjectivity: I could tell you); there’s a Tayloresque focus on his eyes (this time she’s counting the colors in them); and the lyric is built around a single phrase, which in this case is, “If you ask if I love him, I’d lie.”*

But it’s a pretty thin song, really. Its details don’t have the richness of her release material — there are no lines here that conceal entire back stories in a handful of words the way there are in “Picture to Burn” (“I hate that stupid old pick-up truck you never let me drive”) or “Mine” (“a careless man’s careful daughter”), for instance, But it’s a pleasant tune as much as it is a revealing blueprint. In another universe, there’s a less talented Taylor Swift who only lands a modest run of anonymous singles on country radio, and even in that dimension, she’s pretty good.

——

* Building a song by playing around with a single memorable phrase is a common country music trick and it leads astray a lot of people who listen to Swift but don’t know much about country. Because country lyrics are about stories and language, because country music is about culture and community, and because there is an accepted division of labor between the singer and the songwriter, the words in a country song belong simultaneously to the performer voicing them and the country everyperson to whom they could belong. That’s why a performer can sing a range of songs that are entirely contradictory in tone or intent or outlook across his catalogue: he’s isn’t trying to create an authentic representation of self the way an artist in the pop rock tradition does, but an authentic representation of the community he claims to represent. What’s interesting about Taylor is that she adopts the country approach, but, while doing so, creates a voice that is distinctly individual, shaped by her own personal hang-ups and oddities and biography. She is always both Taylor and anybody, her essential self intrinsically composed of a variety of contradictory voices.

60 plays

crystalleww:

This song gets a really bad reputation because it’s supposedly Taylor Swift’s slut-shaming song, but anyone who faults Taylor Swift for this doesn’t really get the point of Taylor Swift, I guess.

"Better Than Revenge" is Taylor Swift’s take on pop punk, from the high energy, nonstop guitar riffing to the backup vocals that have been fed through some sort of speakerbox. This song is practically delivered with the snottiness and sneer of Patrick Stump in Fall Out Boy circa From Under the Cork Tree era, except maybe better because Taylor was always the more direct lyricist. This shit cuts deep in the way that only bitchy teenage girls who get puffed up can and the way that greasy haired teenage boys who play guitar wish they could. If you don’t believe that Taylor Swift is allowed to play that character but Patty can because of some feminist nonsense, then maybe consider what range female pop stars are allowed to exist in yr so-called perfect world.

Taylor Swift’s music has always been about themes. If you think this song, or really any song of hers, is about Joe Jonas’ ex-girlfriend or Taylor Lautner or John Mayer, then you’re really doing a lot of surface level reading here. Her music is consistently about how abuse or loneliness or insecurities or absolute joys feel. “Better Than Revenge”, aside from reflecting a remarkable amount of rage, is also tinged with a little sadness, the “what is wrong with me why doesn’t he like me why would he choose her”. It also tries to channel the unhealthy joy of “winning a breakup”. I have my own stories about this song, from the charming girl who broke my heart by stealing his to the blonde girl who represented my worst nightmare by being the ideal of the American Dream.

And yeah, maybe I’m biased because I guess the line ” They wouldn’t teach you that in prep school so it’s up to me, but no amount of vintage dresses gives you dignity” is 100% perfect. Like, maybe I kinda do have a lil chip on my shoulder about a lot of privilege in the world, and maybe Taylor Swift gets that jealous fixation, too.

n.b. Crystal tagged this post #no sympathy for styles

Also, like, I love that Taylor made what could function as a response to “Misery Business” that sounds just like her pal Hayley Williams’s band.

109 plays

naysayersspeak:

I have the best best friend on the planet. You might think you do, but if so, YOU ARE WRONG

Look at this thing I did!
P.S. I think Erin has replaced me as her best friend with Harry Styles.

naysayersspeak:

I have the best best friend on the planet. You might think you do, but if so, YOU ARE WRONG

Look at this thing I did!

P.S. I think Erin has replaced me as her best friend with Harry Styles.



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10