Posts tagged "politics"

They're just like riding a wire fence.

okcupidblog (via bradofarrell, bigcrush, johncabrera):

Both socially and economically, teenagers prefer an anything-goes type situation. 
But as these teenagers grow up a bit and enter the job market, they quickly develop progressive economic ideas: perhaps a bit of “levelling” seems pretty good when you’re staring up the professional ladder from the bottom rung. Meanwhile, their youthful live-and-let-live social philosophy begins to fade. 
In their late 20s, they start making real money. Economic progressivism goes out the window, preferably out the window of a building with a doorman. As the adult mind turns to more material matters, social views don’t change that much. 
Finally, after the mid-40s, retirement looms. Our former teenagers check their collective 401(k)s and think, you know what, let’s all get checks from the government. Social views take a hard turn for the more restrictive. At the end of the journey, economic and social views are again in agreement—only this time on the other side of the philosophical line!

I call bullshit, first of all because we’re talking about OKCupid users, not Americans, and there is no reason to believe the views of those two groups necessarily coincide. (For a start, should we assume that 60 year olds using a dating service are representative of the rest of their age group?) But more important is this little caveat buried in the actual post:
I realize I’m taking a bit of poetic license with this stuff (for one thing, this chart doesn’t actually show a single individual’s lifespan but rather how people of different ages think right now), but I still feel like this sketch is instructive.
Well I’m glad he “feel[s] like” it is, because he sure doesn’t have anything except truthiness on his side. He’s right that the graph doesn’t show a single individual’s life span, so why does he comment on it as if it did? The graph shows nothing more than the current views of people who use an Internet dating service and have chosen to answer some questions posed to them.
The rest of the post contains a plethora of wrong-headed thinking and abuse of data. And at the bottom is an OKCupid advertisement seeking a “blog analyst” with some “college level statistics.” Hopefully whoever they find has enough of an education about statistics to know not to abuse them like this.

okcupidblog (via bradofarrellbigcrushjohncabrera):

  • Both socially and economically, teenagers prefer an anything-goes type situation.
  • But as these teenagers grow up a bit and enter the job market, they quickly develop progressive economic ideas: perhaps a bit of “levelling” seems pretty good when you’re staring up the professional ladder from the bottom rung. Meanwhile, their youthful live-and-let-live social philosophy begins to fade.
  • In their late 20s, they start making real money. Economic progressivism goes out the window, preferably out the window of a building with a doorman. As the adult mind turns to more material matters, social views don’t change that much.
  • Finally, after the mid-40s, retirement looms. Our former teenagers check their collective 401(k)s and think, you know what, let’s all get checks from the government. Social views take a hard turn for the more restrictive. At the end of the journey, economic and social views are again in agreement—only this time on the other side of the philosophical line!

I call bullshit, first of all because we’re talking about OKCupid users, not Americans, and there is no reason to believe the views of those two groups necessarily coincide. (For a start, should we assume that 60 year olds using a dating service are representative of the rest of their age group?) But more important is this little caveat buried in the actual post:

I realize I’m taking a bit of poetic license with this stuff (for one thing, this chart doesn’t actually show a single individual’s lifespan but rather how people of different ages think right now), but I still feel like this sketch is instructive.

Well I’m glad he “feel[s] like” it is, because he sure doesn’t have anything except truthiness on his side. He’s right that the graph doesn’t show a single individual’s life span, so why does he comment on it as if it did? The graph shows nothing more than the current views of people who use an Internet dating service and have chosen to answer some questions posed to them.

The rest of the post contains a plethora of wrong-headed thinking and abuse of data. And at the bottom is an OKCupid advertisement seeking a “blog analyst” with some “college level statistics.” Hopefully whoever they find has enough of an education about statistics to know not to abuse them like this.


#120: Birthers

american-apologies:

There you go Birthers, now shut the fuck up.

Best.


How Very Banal To Ask What I Mean

All U.S. irony is based on an implicit “I don’t really mean what I say.” So what does irony as a cultural norm mean to say? That it’s impossible to mean what you say? That maybe it’s too bad it’s impossible, but wake up and smell the coffee already? Most likely, I think, today’s irony ends up saying: “How very banal to ask what I mean.” Anyone with the heretical gall to ask an ironist what he actually stands for ends up looking like a hysteric or a prig. And herein lies the oppressiveness of institutionalized irony, the too-successful rebel: the ability to interdict the question without attending to its content is tyranny. It is the new junta, using the very tool that exposed its enemy to insulate itself.

-David Foster Wallace (via nooneisherelovearthandrewtsks)

And here we get at a good part of the reason I find Stuff White People Like so trying. Christian Lander mistook recognition for insight, and in the process came up with a “joke” Republicans had been making about liberals for decades. (But it’s different this time, supposedly, because Lander’s actually a liberal.) His work doesn’t interrogate or explore or say anything new or incisive about race and class in the United States. Lander thinks he deserves a cookie for merely making his observations. How very banal to ask what he means!


The Real World Doctrine: Obama's next justice.

Russia now visible from her TV studio.

Beyond the Pale

via Ezra Klein

From here.

From here.



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