Posts tagged "music"

Death Cab for Cutie – Meet Me on the Equinox
Don’t know if it’s actually about vampires, but Ben Gibbard seems to enjoy the opportunity to play the homme fatale here, intoning “Everything ends” with a moderately impressive amount of doom. There’s a bit of that same helpless descent in the brisk rhythm, too, though it’s produced with the same crisp, dry palette Chris Walla used on Narrow Stairs, the band’s most recent record. That aesthetic was less absorbing than the enveloping Northwestern gloom of the band’s classic material, a choice that made little sense sonically, and in this case, makes absolutely none thematically. One of the few things I know about the Twilight series, the second film of which this soundtracks, is that it is set in the Olympic peninsula town of Forks. “Meet Me On The Equinox” would better suit the evergreen richness of Transatlanticism-era Death Cab; instead it has merely the sound of “Grapevine Fires” without that song’s emotional richness.[6]
Jukebox says [4.25]. I overrated this. Sorry, guys.

Death Cab for Cutie – Meet Me on the Equinox

Don’t know if it’s actually about vampires, but Ben Gibbard seems to enjoy the opportunity to play the homme fatale here, intoning “Everything ends” with a moderately impressive amount of doom. There’s a bit of that same helpless descent in the brisk rhythm, too, though it’s produced with the same crisp, dry palette Chris Walla used on Narrow Stairs, the band’s most recent record. That aesthetic was less absorbing than the enveloping Northwestern gloom of the band’s classic material, a choice that made little sense sonically, and in this case, makes absolutely none thematically. One of the few things I know about the Twilight series, the second film of which this soundtracks, is that it is set in the Olympic peninsula town of Forks. “Meet Me On The Equinox” would better suit the evergreen richness of Transatlanticism-era Death Cab; instead it has merely the sound of “Grapevine Fires” without that song’s emotional richness.
[6]

Jukebox says [4.25]. I overrated this. Sorry, guys.


Britney Spears – 3
“3″ announces the return of Blackout Britney; the pop-cyborg ghost-in-the-machine who may once upon a time have been a real girl, but is today a juggernaut of studio wizardry. This could be sexual, but it doesn’t need to be; the point is in its pummel. Britney’s robot-kitten vocal dices, the synths slice, and the handclaps fricassee. Trying to resist this is like bringing fists to a knife fight.[8]
Jukebox says [6.06]

Britney Spears – 3

“3″ announces the return of Blackout Britney; the pop-cyborg ghost-in-the-machine who may once upon a time have been a real girl, but is today a juggernaut of studio wizardry. This could be sexual, but it doesn’t need to be; the point is in its pummel. Britney’s robot-kitten vocal dices, the synths slice, and the handclaps fricassee. Trying to resist this is like bringing fists to a knife fight.
[8]

Jukebox says [6.06]


Vampire Weekend – Horchata
Amongst this band of dapper sophisticates we have writing here at the Jukebox I tend to stand out as a kind of slack-jawed yokel, so it should come as no real surprise that I had to turn to Wikipedia for definitions of “Aranciata,” “Masada” and, indeed, “horchata” (perhaps Australia’s distance from Latin America can excuse the last of these). But the new Vampire Weekend single is more than the cascade of self-aware pseudo-cleverness it masquerades as, and rice-drink ends up having very little to do with anything at all. Rather, Ezra Koenig seduces with highly specific, yet context-free, details that pop up to the song’s surface the way old memories do. “Horchata” intertwines the coziness of reminiscence with the coziness of wintertime warmth, accentuating the plain domesticity of small moments, such as the oddly evocative “look down your glasses at the Aranciata” and the awkward “With lips and teeth to ask how my day went.” “You’d remember,” the singer urges, and, trying to stir the same memories in the song’s object: “Here comes a feeling you thought you’d forgotten.” Then the Afro-pop affectations yield to the swirl of blue blood strings, and Koenig’s voice swells: “You had it, but — oh no — you lost it/Looking back you shouldn’t have fought it,” and it turns out that this collection of fleeting moments and proper nouns is far more emotional than its sense of propriety is willing to allow. [8]
Jukebox says [5.79]

Vampire Weekend – Horchata

Amongst this band of dapper sophisticates we have writing here at the Jukebox I tend to stand out as a kind of slack-jawed yokel, so it should come as no real surprise that I had to turn to Wikipedia for definitions of “Aranciata,” “Masada” and, indeed, “horchata” (perhaps Australia’s distance from Latin America can excuse the last of these). But the new Vampire Weekend single is more than the cascade of self-aware pseudo-cleverness it masquerades as, and rice-drink ends up having very little to do with anything at all. Rather, Ezra Koenig seduces with highly specific, yet context-free, details that pop up to the song’s surface the way old memories do. “Horchata” intertwines the coziness of reminiscence with the coziness of wintertime warmth, accentuating the plain domesticity of small moments, such as the oddly evocative “look down your glasses at the Aranciata” and the awkward “With lips and teeth to ask how my day went.” “You’d remember,” the singer urges, and, trying to stir the same memories in the song’s object: “Here comes a feeling you thought you’d forgotten.” Then the Afro-pop affectations yield to the swirl of blue blood strings, and Koenig’s voice swells: “You had it, but — oh no — you lost it/Looking back you shouldn’t have fought it,” and it turns out that this collection of fleeting moments and proper nouns is far more emotional than its sense of propriety is willing to allow. 
[8]

Jukebox says [5.79]


Roisin Murphy – Orally Fixated
I can get behind the fidgety synths and skipping rhythms, even if it doesn’t actually develop any momentum; this tune pouts and loiters like a teenager at the mall. And — can you believe? — it does this for four and a half minutes. But Murphy has no presence whatsoever, and her wispy gasping is a handy reminder as to why the words “disco” and “diva” are such a natural combination. If this had been the Basement Jaxx tune it clearly wants to be, that pair would have at least had the good grace to find a guest with a bit of gusto to perform the vocal.[4]
Jukebox says [6.00]. Wrong.

Roisin Murphy – Orally Fixated

I can get behind the fidgety synths and skipping rhythms, even if it doesn’t actually develop any momentum; this tune pouts and loiters like a teenager at the mall. And — can you believe? — it does this for four and a half minutes. But Murphy has no presence whatsoever, and her wispy gasping is a handy reminder as to why the words “disco” and “diva” are such a natural combination. If this had been the Basement Jaxx tune it clearly wants to be, that pair would have at least had the good grace to find a guest with a bit of gusto to perform the vocal.
[4]

Jukebox says [6.00]. Wrong.


DJ Khaled ft. Usher, Young Jeezy, Rick Ross and Drake – Fed Up
Drake mentions Lil’ Wayne in the first line of his verse, prompting thoughts of Weezy’s star turn on “We Takin’ Over.” That prior Khaled single had a stunning beat and a line-up of great rappers turning in credible performances. How tepid “Fed Up” is by comparison; a verse from the usually-reliable Young Jeezy that makes no impression whatsoever, a verse from Rick Ross that is a verse from Rick Ross, and way too much Usher, way too many synth-tsunamis and way too little of anything worth caring about.[2]
Jukebox says [4.10]

DJ Khaled ft. Usher, Young Jeezy, Rick Ross and Drake – Fed Up

Drake mentions Lil’ Wayne in the first line of his verse, prompting thoughts of Weezy’s star turn on “We Takin’ Over.” That prior Khaled single had a stunning beat and a line-up of great rappers turning in credible performances. How tepid “Fed Up” is by comparison; a verse from the usually-reliable Young Jeezy that makes no impression whatsoever, a verse from Rick Ross that is a verse from Rick Ross, and way too much Usher, way too many synth-tsunamis and way too little of anything worth caring about.
[2]

Jukebox says [4.10]


The Decemberists - Of Angels and Angles

One of the worst things about the Decemberists is Colin Meloy’s fondness for theatricality, but then again, that’s one of the best things about the Decemberists as well. You take the preposterous with the delightful with this band. But “Of Angels and Angles,” the quiet little coda to their 2005 album Picaresque isn’t very theatrical at all. It’s a calm and simple meditation on a lover’s beauty; warm and affectionate in its attention to detail, but crushingly melancholic in its palpable distance. Meloy looks, but clearly he doesn’t touch.

My favorite part is the line about “the tough word/on your crossword,” the suggestion of a man entranced by the depth of thought of a woman engrossed in a word game, presumably unaware of the affect she is having. “Of Angels and Angles” is a song about men* looking in awe at all those funny details women have; the strange prettiness in a freckle or a protruding bone or a bra strap, or the way her hair hangs just so, or the frown on her face when the newspaper’s puzzle page stumps her.

*By which I mean me, of course, I don’t actually know what other men think.

3 plays
1
Nov 29

The Rap Against Rockism

fightwithknives:

The Replacements - “Kiss Me on the Bus”

One of the constructions that appeared in many conversations with friends recently has been, “Well, if you were an adult, you would…” or “I did the adult thing to do, which was…” or “You know, be an adult.” Whether in hilarious irony or in all seriousness, I imagine most people in their mid- to late-20s start throwing the A-word around, all of us attempting to prove our maturity or inability to grow up by comparing our behavior to that of real “adults,” even though no one really knows what that means.

For Paul Westerberg, being an adult means that you’re not into PTDAs (Public Transportation Displays of Affection), and that’s extremely lame. Waiting to get home to start making out is something that married people do, and you’re young and virile and on the 4 going back to Northeast from the CC Club. Mature people have cars; you’re on the bus and it’s cold from the draft of the window, but the person next to you is warm and jazzed and ready to go. Waiting is for adults. Give in to the adolescent temptation.

Reblogging this because I also am known to use the construction described in the first paragraph, and because the song is excellent — do I hear a touch of R.E.M. there not usually present in your everyday Replacements tune?

54 plays

song of the year nominees

maura:

lady gaga, poker face

maxwell, pretty wings (!!)

beyoncé, single ladies

kings of leon, use somebody

taylor swift, you belong with me

a kinda decent list! GO MAXWELL and yay no black eyed peas

The answer to this is so mind-blowingly obvious that I dread when the Grammy will inevitably go to Beyoncé because then we won’t get Taylor Swift stunned that she won a Grammy and she never expected to even be nominated, and gosh-darn it she’s so cute.

Don’t worry Taylor, you’ll get your Grammy in six years time when you’ve released an album full of mature country pop you wrote yourselfmade a song with John Mayer … recorded a boring folk album with Alison Krauss and Herbie Hancock.


Imagine if the internet as we know it now was around in 1988, and a bunch of (mostly) out-of-touch cranks got together to viciously rip on "Teenage Riot."


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