Posts tagged "media"

langer:

It’s nice when banner headlines aren’t about war.

Liberty and the New York Times and coffee. America, these are some of my favorite things about you.

langer:

It’s nice when banner headlines aren’t about war.

Liberty and the New York Times and coffee. America, these are some of my favorite things about you.

(Source: langer)


(+61) I just bought you a present
email:
me: Don’t be an idiot. That’s not a real book.
Erin: It is and it is now yours

(+61) I just bought you a present

email:

me: Don’t be an idiot. That’s not a real book.

Erin: It is and it is now yours


Maura: i had a lot to say about the pomplamoose show

naming blogs is easy: Also

Baulkham Hills is an emblem of prosperous, conservative, Sydney. It’s a whitebread culture, and any Liberal candidate’s dream.

As urban planners scheme to attract the “creative class” who fuel innovation, drink good coffee and go to work in designer jeans, you might not pick this dormitory suburb as an epicentre of creativity exports, but you should. The big story of Baulkham Hills is Hillsong, and it has torn up a 2000-year-old rule book on how a church should look and feel. Hillsong Conference this week welcomes 16,000 delegates and as many unticketed guests to celebrate its 25th anniversary.

Ross Cameron, “The Hills are alive with the sound of music  and it’s uplifting,” Sydney Morning Herald, July 7, 2011

This article is pretty terrible. After the scene-setting introduction and some cod-sociological musing, Cameron settles into explaining that he really really really really likes his church. Good for you, bro. Not exactly pressing stuff for a national broadsheet to be engaging with, however; I’m sure the SMH could have easily gotten a similarly impassioned article on Catholicism, Islam, Scientology, or whatever it is that makes people think it’s a real lark to write “Jedi” in on the religion slot on the census.

Two things, however:

  1. Ross Cameron was a Liberal candidate — and a Liberal politician, representing the seat of Parramatta in Federal Parliament from 1996 to 2004, when he lost his seat to the ALP candidate Julie Owens. I didn’t think a Liberal politician would be so forthright about admitting that his party’s ideal constituency consists of well-off white people, but there you go.
  2. It might be cod-sociological musing, but there’s something to Cameron’s framing of a suburban megachurch as a cultural epicenter. It’s not the kind of culture liberals* like me value, but it is culture. I feel like I’m leading an undergraduate seminar in asking this, but: Is Cameron right? Can a megachurch be compared with a neighborhood of boutiques and wine bars? Why or why not?

——

*For the unobservant or non-Australian, note carefully my use of capitalization on the word “liberal” — or lack thereof —  throughout this post.


Where Twitter and Flickr are used, by Eric Fisher. Flickr = red; Twitter = blue.
Adam Martin, The Atlantic Wire:

More Flickr users have tagged the mountains in the west but more Twitter users seem to be operating in the Southeast. Notice how the cities and main highways facilitate both, but there’s that band of relative darkness running through the central states.

Where Twitter and Flickr are used, by Eric Fisher. Flickr = red; Twitter = blue.

Adam Martin, The Atlantic Wire:

More Flickr users have tagged the mountains in the west but more Twitter users seem to be operating in the Southeast. Notice how the cities and main highways facilitate both, but there’s that band of relative darkness running through the central states.


Did I tell you I am on Goodreads?

Social Networking based on books seems only slightly less useful than Google+, but I don’t really use the social aspect of it. (I’m friends with one other person, who added me. Not that I mind, Ian!)

Goodreads has so endeared itself to me because it indulges my yearning for order through excessive cataloguing. The practice of categorization is the only thing I’m at all neat about, and because Goodreads holds out the promise of stats (like last.fm!) and facilitates self-reported consumption habits, I’ve become completely hooked. I try to read books faster just so I can mark them as finished.

The ability to record the precise date I finish a book is what has left me helpless before this service. See, I started recording books not just as I finished them, but books I’ve previously read, as well! For instance, I found a Google chat transcript in which I mentioned finishing reading Barack Obama’s Dreams From my Father, which let me insert it on to my “read” shelf, with the exact date I finished it marked. I can’t tell you how satisfying that is.

The problem is that for the vast majority of books I have read, I do not know the exact date I finished them. I’ve relaxed my standard to the approximate month I finished them (for instance, I finished Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go shortly after I arrived in Seattle last year, so I have that marked as March 2010), but even then, determining the month or even the year I finished some books is a daunting task. I have no idea whether I read The Great Gatsby when I was in high school or university. I do remember that I got my copy of Brand New World when my high school library was clearing out some of its old stock, but which year of high school was that? And when did I read my first Roald Dahl book: when I was seven, or was I older? I thought I’d begun reading him before he died, but now I’m not sure!

These are anxiety-inducing questions for me.

The most useful and less dorky use for Goodreads is its ability to record books I have not yet read, but intend to. I split this into two categories, or, in the website’s terminology, “shelves.” “To Read” is for things I don’t own but want to read, while “Stacks” contains the unread items I actually own.

After the jump are the books currently on my To Read shelf:

Read More


The global implications for the News Corporation are tougher to discern. Will the damage jump the pond and hurt the company’s American operations or just be seen as a Piccadilly sideshow?

David Carr, “A Tabloid Shame, Exposed by Earnest Rivals,” The New York Times, July 10, 2011

America, you know I love you, right? It’s just that the juxtaposition of these two sentences is so you, America. What is global? Global is America and one other country.

It’s a good article, though. This paragraph in particular satiates the journalism student still in me: 

Think of it. There was Mr. Murdoch, tying on a napkin and ready to dine on the other 60 percent of BSkyB that he did not already have. But just as he was about to swallow yet another tasty morsel, the hands at his throat belonged to, yes, newspaper journalists.


Stroking your chin and saying, well, I don’t believe in magical solutions because experience shows that raising growth is hard sounds serious, but it’s actually silly. It’s like saying that it’s really hard to extend the human lifespan, so it’s foolish to believe that an infection can be quickly cured with a dose of antibiotics.

Paul Krugman, “Do You Believe In Magic,” The New York Times, July 12, 2011

Krugman ethers David Brooks’s vacuous ass. I’d hate to see what he’d have done if they weren’t co-workers. 

Really though, this is more “Takeover” than “Ether”: DAVID BROOKS, YOU ARE NOT DEEP. What, you trying to kick knowledge? Somebody buy Mr. Bobo Paradise a kufi for Krugman to smack.


tomewing:

hautepop:

“If urban history can be applied to virtual space and the evolution of the Web, the unruly and twisted message boards are Jane Jacobs. They were built for people, and without much regard to profit. How else do you get crowds of not especially lucrative demographics like flashlight buffs (candlepowerforums.com), feminists (bust.com) and jazz aficionados (forums.allaboutjazz.com)? By contrast, the Web 2.0 juggernauts like Facebook and YouTube are driven by metrics and supported by ads and data mining. They’re networks, and super-fast — but not communities, which are inefficient, emotive and comfortable. Facebook — with its clean lines and social expressways — is Robert Moses par excellence.”
Best internet metaphor ever
The Old Internet Neighborhoods by Virginia Heffernan, Sunday 10th July, NYTimes.

I am too ignant to get the metaphor but I liked this article. I was writing a training module today and threw in a slide on “the history of online communities”. “Neighbourhoods” is a nice way of putting it. What’s also interesting is that so much of the culture of the internet - its acronyms, tropes, habits, manners - comes from those neighbourhoods, just as (I guess) a lot of a city’s culture does.

Agreed. Nice article, and it should be no surprise to discover I enjoy a good city metaphor.
On that: Jane Jacobs wrote The Death and Life of American Cities, which I have not read. I understand the gist, however: urban life is at its best in dense, vibrant neighborhoods that arise organically. Greenwich Village was Jacobs’s model, and she was specifically reacting to the modernist urban redevelopment policies of Robert Moses. Moses was big on tearing down the old and building vast new projects: freeways and housing projects.
Moses and Jacobs came to a head when Moses wanted to build a freeway right through the middle of lower Manhattan. I think nearly everyone is relieved that Jacobs won this fight, and history has not unreasonably cast Jacobs as the heroine and Moses the devil. A friend of mine, however, who is better read on this sort of thing than I am, suggests that might be a touch unfair. Despite the good Jacobs did, a lot of Moses’s redevelopment was necessary to make Manhattan the kind of city it is today. Without his casual disregard for human connections, my friend says, Manhattan might have ended up more like San Francisco: a thriving city, but not the center of a dominant metropolis. I can’t evaluate the truth of this, but since my friend is the last person you’d expect to praise Moses — she’s fond of bikes — I place some stock in her analysis.

tomewing:

hautepop:

“If urban history can be applied to virtual space and the evolution of the Web, the unruly and twisted message boards are Jane Jacobs. They were built for people, and without much regard to profit. How else do you get crowds of not especially lucrative demographics like flashlight buffs (candlepowerforums.com), feminists (bust.com) and jazz aficionados (forums.allaboutjazz.com)? By contrast, the Web 2.0 juggernauts like Facebook and YouTube are driven by metrics and supported by ads and data mining. They’re networks, and super-fast — but not communities, which are inefficient, emotive and comfortable. Facebook — with its clean lines and social expressways — is Robert Moses par excellence.”

Best internet metaphor ever

The Old Internet Neighborhoods by Virginia Heffernan, Sunday 10th July, NYTimes.

I am too ignant to get the metaphor but I liked this article. I was writing a training module today and threw in a slide on “the history of online communities”. “Neighbourhoods” is a nice way of putting it. What’s also interesting is that so much of the culture of the internet - its acronyms, tropes, habits, manners - comes from those neighbourhoods, just as (I guess) a lot of a city’s culture does.

Agreed. Nice article, and it should be no surprise to discover I enjoy a good city metaphor.

On that: Jane Jacobs wrote The Death and Life of American Cities, which I have not read. I understand the gist, however: urban life is at its best in dense, vibrant neighborhoods that arise organically. Greenwich Village was Jacobs’s model, and she was specifically reacting to the modernist urban redevelopment policies of Robert Moses. Moses was big on tearing down the old and building vast new projects: freeways and housing projects.

Moses and Jacobs came to a head when Moses wanted to build a freeway right through the middle of lower Manhattan. I think nearly everyone is relieved that Jacobs won this fight, and history has not unreasonably cast Jacobs as the heroine and Moses the devil. A friend of mine, however, who is better read on this sort of thing than I am, suggests that might be a touch unfair. Despite the good Jacobs did, a lot of Moses’s redevelopment was necessary to make Manhattan the kind of city it is today. Without his casual disregard for human connections, my friend says, Manhattan might have ended up more like San Francisco: a thriving city, but not the center of a dominant metropolis. I can’t evaluate the truth of this, but since my friend is the last person you’d expect to praise Moses — she’s fond of bikes — I place some stock in her analysis.



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