Posts tagged "girls"

New England Girls, We’re Really Practical

girlboymusic:

hortenseg:

If you really have sunkissed skin so hot that it will melt a popsicle, you should consider going to the emergency room, as you most likely have sun poisoning and/or heat stroke and are probably incredibly dehydrated.

Actually, the skin temperature of a healthy human adult hovers around 90 degrees Fahrenheit, well above the freezing point of water, which is 32 degrees Fahrenheit. And the freezing point of a sugar solution, which is what I assume a Popsicle is made of, is lower than the freezing point of water.   So really, fucking anyone is hot enough to melt a Popsicle.

New York / New Jersey Girls: We’re Fucking Know-It-Alls.

Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll endorses American regionalism. Also, girls.


jonathanbogart:

Totally adorable: Andi Watson’s font series on Flickr.

This is great.

jonathanbogart:

Totally adorable: Andi Watson’s font series on Flickr.

This is great.


You think you understand but you don’t! You just analyze everything until it barely even exists.

Angela Chase, “My So-Called Life,” Ep 01.07: Why Jordan Can’t Read

Oh, Angela. You kill me.



You know, yeah, I was somewhat obsessed with him — at one time! — but not anymore, because I’ve moved beyond that.

Angela Chase, “My So-Called Life,” Ep 01.07: Why Jordan Can’t Read
I like “My So-Called Life” because I used to say very well thought out and totally incorrect things like this when I was fifteen as well.

You know, yeah, I was somewhat obsessed with him — at one time! — but not anymore, because I’ve moved beyond that.

Angela Chase, “My So-Called Life,” Ep 01.07: Why Jordan Can’t Read

I like “My So-Called Life” because I used to say very well thought out and totally incorrect things like this when I was fifteen as well.


Not a child.

Not a child.


Not a… oh.
This was like season one, come on.

Not a… oh.

This was like season one, come on.


Not a…
Wow, what is this?
Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll would like to announce it has ceased objectifying fictional women, and will go back to being sexless.

Not a…

Wow, what is this?

Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll would like to announce it has ceased objectifying fictional women, and will go back to being sexless.


Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll is a total boys’ club tonight.

andrewtsks replied to your photo: Not a child.

She’s 29. She was nearly 20 the day the Gilmore Girls pilot aired. You are safe.

Yep. Besides, I was in high school when the show started, so even if she weren’t older than me, I’d get a pass.

douglasmartini replied to your photo: Not a child.

DEEEEEEEEEEUM *Young Jeezy voice*

THAAAAAAT’S RIGHT *Young Jeezy voice*


GPOYWhatever
I went to buy American Slang from Easy Street records today, but they were sold out. “Oh, that’s OK,” I said, but they responded, “No, it’s not OK. We had a problem with our supplier.” So they gave me a $2 voucher and promised me the record would be in tomorrow.
I’m wearing a Hold Steady shirt in this photograph, and carrying the Gaslight Anthem postcards they gave me in lieu of the album, which is useful because it lets me tell you about the difference between the Hold Steady and the Gaslight Anthem. They’re both fairly similar bands, you know. Playing anachronistic rock ‘n’ roll with a deep respect for the heroes of yesterday, particularly the one hero to rule them all, Bruce Springsteen.
Both Hold Steady and Gaslight Anthem sing, always, songs about girls, but more importantly they sing songs about being around music. But they sing about music differently, and herein lies the distinction. The Hold Steady sings about being around music: shows, concerts, scenes and scene girls. Their references concern conversation about bands between devotees. It’s fascinating because we, the audience, recognize our own discussions in Craig Finn’s words.
The Gaslight Anthem, on the other hand, sings songs about music itself. The band’s borrowed lyrics, its easy slippage between the everyday and the lyrical, speaks directly to the experience of listening to music. This is a band about not the moshing crowd but instead the revolving 45. Lead singer Brian Fallon sings about Miles Davis and Tom Petty and Adam Duritz (!?) and, of course, Bruce Springsteen. And Fallon sings about girls, too. Finding girls in those songs and understanding girls through those songs.
The Hold Steady sings about girls as well. Their girls are girls out at the parties and the shows; the girls on the scene. Does this make Craig Finn’s girls more real than Brian Fallon’s imagined musical girls? Maybe. But Fallon knows girls too, and perhaps Finn’s are as much an imagined, romantic ideal as Fallon’s are.
Because don’t all boys have imagined, romantic ideas of girls? Doesn’t everyone have an ideal? Isn’t the struggle in pop music always about the gap between idealized imagined girls and real girls, better and worse than you might have imagined?

GPOYWhatever

I went to buy American Slang from Easy Street records today, but they were sold out. “Oh, that’s OK,” I said, but they responded, “No, it’s not OK. We had a problem with our supplier.” So they gave me a $2 voucher and promised me the record would be in tomorrow.

I’m wearing a Hold Steady shirt in this photograph, and carrying the Gaslight Anthem postcards they gave me in lieu of the album, which is useful because it lets me tell you about the difference between the Hold Steady and the Gaslight Anthem. They’re both fairly similar bands, you know. Playing anachronistic rock ‘n’ roll with a deep respect for the heroes of yesterday, particularly the one hero to rule them all, Bruce Springsteen.

Both Hold Steady and Gaslight Anthem sing, always, songs about girls, but more importantly they sing songs about being around music. But they sing about music differently, and herein lies the distinction. The Hold Steady sings about being around music: shows, concerts, scenes and scene girls. Their references concern conversation about bands between devotees. It’s fascinating because we, the audience, recognize our own discussions in Craig Finn’s words.

The Gaslight Anthem, on the other hand, sings songs about music itself. The band’s borrowed lyrics, its easy slippage between the everyday and the lyrical, speaks directly to the experience of listening to music. This is a band about not the moshing crowd but instead the revolving 45. Lead singer Brian Fallon sings about Miles Davis and Tom Petty and Adam Duritz (!?) and, of course, Bruce Springsteen. And Fallon sings about girls, too. Finding girls in those songs and understanding girls through those songs.

The Hold Steady sings about girls as well. Their girls are girls out at the parties and the shows; the girls on the scene. Does this make Craig Finn’s girls more real than Brian Fallon’s imagined musical girls? Maybe. But Fallon knows girls too, and perhaps Finn’s are as much an imagined, romantic ideal as Fallon’s are.

Because don’t all boys have imagined, romantic ideas of girls? Doesn’t everyone have an ideal? Isn’t the struggle in pop music always about the gap between idealized imagined girls and real girls, better and worse than you might have imagined?


Top Ten Things About Katy Perry’s Video for “California Gurls”

01. I’ve already said I love “California Gurls” for the way it engages with popular mythological representations of California, so I’m disappointed the video ignores all that and does some weird shit in the Land of Chocolate.

02. Perry touches some snakes and then all of a sudden she’s naked. I wish I were thirteen so I’d have a chance to reveal to someone what this really means.

03. Having just a brother, I’d only received second hand information about where girls come from. I’d been told they were birthed from women, or possibly delivered by storks, but I’m thankful to ”California Gurls” for informing me that girls actually are produced fully formed in hermetically sealed packaging, waiting for a savior to release them into their proper state of vibrant innocent vitality.

04. Girl Scouts are sexy and will eat you alive.

05. Snoop “Murder Was the Case” Dogg is threatening because he leads an army of Gummi Bears characterized by a fondness for rude gestures.

06. Katy Perry’s breasts have a bizarre anatomical idiosyncrasy that allow them to be connected to whipped cream dispensers. This renders Perry’s breast milk, in whipped form, lethal to Gummi Bears and incapacitating to Snoop Doggs.

07. I’d never been attracted to Perry before this video, but um.

08. As Sean Fennessey pointed out:

[Producer Dr.] Luke seems to be attracted to strong women who are also self-effacing goofballs … When she emerged, Perry seemed to embody the body-as-weapon ideology, acting pouty and dressing scandalously (if still goofily) while singing about kissing girls. But with Luke’s guidance, Perry’s sexiness began to play as mostly a ruse, as plastic as the inflatable fruit that checkered the stage during her live performances. Her biggest hits are post-sex. She’s since emerged as the goofiest of the bunch—the truest product of a svengali who prizes personality over provocation— a fact confirmed by her recent choice of beau, the self-involved British comedian Russell Brand. 

Look at the way Perry lolls coquettishly across the cloud, a determined performer of poised female sexuality except, oh, oops, the cloud turned out to be made of cotton candy and she just had to eat some of it. Oops. How silly of her.

09. When Snoop’s incapacitated, his captors bury him up to his neck in sherbet or something and turn him into David Lee Roth. This is different to Snoop’s prior state because he’s now buried up to his neck in sherbet.

10. This is probably better than whatever wins the Best Picture Oscar next year.



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