Posts tagged "america"

Icecream Mountain!
(pic via ourseattle, robot-heart, joshc)

Icecream Mountain!

(pic via ourseattlerobot-heartjoshc)


Least favorite people

kingdrake1:

1. Joe Lieberman

Word.


Interview: Robert Hill in Copenhagen

(via rizillio)
Yes.

(via rizillio)

Yes.


Call me Eddie Murphy, guys, because I’m coming to America.
December 26. 2009.

Call me Eddie Murphy, guys, because I’m coming to America.

December 26. 2009.


The Parks Department has declared today a “snow day” and opened hills for sledding and snow making throughout the city with some parks offering sleds and free hot chocolate.

NY1, “City Shovels Snowy Streets Clean

Rachel: “The federal governent doesn’t think everyone has the right to health care, but New York thinks everyone has the right to sleds and hot chocolate!”

(via barthel)

America. Whatta country.

11
Dec 20

2010

Screw Rock ‘n’ Roll is traveling. Also, it’s in America now. (Rough details here.)

Back in 2010.


Outside of Popeyes eating chicken and fries.
(GPOYWhatever)

Outside of Popeyes eating chicken and fries.

(GPOYWhatever)


Erin with the strangest thing we’ve encountered in the States thus far. Tim-Tams. In an American supermarket. And not made by Arnotts, either.

Erin with the strangest thing we’ve encountered in the States thus far. Tim-Tams. In an American supermarket. And not made by Arnotts, either.


We get so much American music here in the rest of the world that we forget that entire genres of American music barely permeate our consciousness; it belongs to them, not us. Corny country singers and snappin’, jerkin’, hyphyin’, chicken-noodle-soupin’ black kids; New York icons like Dipset and New Orleans aliens beaming mixtape transmissions like Lil’ Wayne; and genuine celebrities like T.I., whose mega-hit “What You Know” only existed as an Internet record for me because, down here, King arrived in stores months after its American release. In the early ‘00s, even emo and indie rock seemed a peculiar, exotic creation of American collegiate culture, as removed from my own experience as any other world music. But through the wonder of copper wire and optical fiber, any mainstream was my mainstream. Any scene was my scene. We lived on the Internet now.

This spirit infused stuff that wasn’t even Internet music. Timbaland fell in love with Indian rhythms and rappers swiped dancehall cadences. African artists like K’Naan and Akon came to North America and released Western music, while Vampire Weekend grabbed Afro-pop rhythms for their indie pop tunes, subsequently taken back by Malawian Londoner Esau Mwamwaya. Jay-Z turned Panjabi MC’s “Mundian To Bach Ke” into a worldwide hit and used it to protest the invasion of Iraq. Maori rappers showed up on my TV, and, when I downloaded M.I.A.’s Kala I found a new version of a song by some Koori kids from out Wilcannia that had already been a novelty hit here. And back in Internetland, the online émigrés watched as the digital Nisei created a wave of sounds that existed within Mediafire links on Wordpress posts: blog house, MySpace Teenpop, mashup, shitgaze, glo-fi, and — whether Uffie or the Cool Kids — a deluge of hipster rap.

White Man in the Global Palais: Reporting Live from Internet Border Communities

I wrote an essay for Stylus’ decade-end reunion. It’s about globalization and music and the Internet and America. Some of it’s about M.I.A.; actually, a small chunk of it is something I wanted to write about Piracy Funds Terrorism but never found the right time or place to do so. Quoted above is a portion of my article; you can read the rest here.



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