Posts tagged "Movies"

What business is this corner better known for?

What business is this corner better known for?


nervousacid answered your question: What business is this corner better known for?
That was the fake record store in High Fidelity one summer. (I was an extra in that.) I think it used to be the Victory Records store, too.
Correct!
And: dude, you were in High Fidelity and Texas is the Reason? Even one of these would make you cooler than, I dunno, an astronaut, but the combination? Damn.

nervousacid answered your questionWhat business is this corner better known for?

That was the fake record store in High Fidelity one summer. (I was an extra in that.) I think it used to be the Victory Records store, too.

Correct!

And: dude, you were in High Fidelity and Texas is the Reason? Even one of these would make you cooler than, I dunno, an astronaut, but the combination? Damn.


fightwithknives:

screwrocknroll:

What business is this corner better known for?

This bar makes a pretty decent mezcal old fashioned, which is almost as good as a deleted Smiths single.

Great answer. I know what I’m having next time I’m in Chicago.

fightwithknives:

screwrocknroll:

What business is this corner better known for?

This bar makes a pretty decent mezcal old fashioned, which is almost as good as a deleted Smiths single.

Great answer. I know what I’m having next time I’m in Chicago.


"The Simpsons," Ep. 05.16: Homer Loves Flanders

Father sheep: What’s wrong, Jeremiah?
Jeremiah: It’s not fair.  My brother Joseph has a sin to confess.  I               wish I had one too.
Father sheep: Oh, don’t you see?  You do have a sin to confess: the sin of envy.
[sheep baa their laughter]
Todd Flanders: It’s all well and good for sheep, but what are we to do? 

——
In re:

Toy Story is packed with plenty of after-film discussion fodder. Parents can use Bible verses such as Ecclesiastes 3:1 and Luke 9:46-48 to examine Woody’s jealousy. They can use Buzz’s realization that he is just a toy—and his decision to be the best toy possible—to help children accept who they are as God’s creations. As a tangent—one that links directly to 1 Corinthians 12—they can talk about how the barrel of monkeys, Slinky Dog and the other toys use their uniqueness to work toward a common goal. And it’s always worth asking how Woody’s negative attitude toward Buzz caused his friends to doubt his honesty later.

——
I might just throw in that this is why it’s a bad idea to get too hung up on morality when you’re critiquing something. You know, like, with rap records, etc.

"The Simpsons," Ep. 05.16: Homer Loves Flanders

Father sheep: What’s wrong, Jeremiah?

Jeremiah: It’s not fair. My brother Joseph has a sin to confess. I wish I had one too.

Father sheep: Oh, don’t you see? You do have a sin to confess: the sin of envy.

[sheep baa their laughter]

Todd Flanders: It’s all well and good for sheep, but what are we to do? 

——

In re:

Toy Story is packed with plenty of after-film discussion fodder. Parents can use Bible verses such as Ecclesiastes 3:1 and Luke 9:46-48 to examine Woody’s jealousy. They can use Buzz’s realization that he is just a toy—and his decision to be the best toy possible—to help children accept who they are as God’s creations. As a tangent—one that links directly to 1 Corinthians 12—they can talk about how the barrel of monkeys, Slinky Dog and the other toys use their uniqueness to work toward a common goal. And it’s always worth asking how Woody’s negative attitude toward Buzz caused his friends to doubt his honesty later.

——

I might just throw in that this is why it’s a bad idea to get too hung up on morality when you’re critiquing something. You know, like, with rap records, etc.


I told you about how I had no real interest in seeing Get Him to the Greek, and now, thanks to New York magazine, I have no reason to see it at all. Thanks to this wobbly camcorder footage, I can say I’ve watched the one part of the movie that could have interested me: Paul Krugman’s scene. 


A question about Inception.

Spoilers ahead, I suppose.

OK. So. We’ve got Cillian Murphy’s character, and Leonardo DiCaprio wants to get into his dreams to convince him to break up his father’s company. Awesome. And to do it Leo and his team sedate Murphy on a flight from Sydney to Los Angeles.

Now, at the end when they land in L.A., the Australian flight attendant asks the passengers if they need immigration forms (this is actually an I-94, and I’m pretty sure flight attendants don’t refer to them as immigration forms, but whatever). Murphy takes one, so clearly he’s not American. And when Leo returns his passport to him earlier in the movie, he hands him what looks to be an Australian passport. 

So is the target of the whole inception plan an Aussie? He sure doesn’t sound it! Murphy’s accent sounded nondescriptly mid-Atlantic to me, though I wasn’t exactly paying attention and he doesn’t spend that much time talking in the movie anyways. (Most of the time he’s running around and looking confused.) But his father died in Sydney, and we’re told he makes the flight from Sydney to L.A. every few weeks, so it sounds to me like he’s one of ours. Maybe he’s an Irish immigrant or something whose globe-trotting business activities have mellowed his accent into what we hear in the movie.

If so, thanks for bringing down a great Australian business empire, assholes.

(Related question: In Finding Nemo, why are the sharks and the birds Australian but the residents of the Great Barrier Reef American? IT MAKES NO SENSE.)

As for the actual “mystery” ending of Inception: Well, it doesn’t matter does it?


Even if it might make the preservation and transmission of particular pieces of music more difficult, I would still prefer a version of musical discourse based on the barter that is individuals constructing, comparing and negotiating their tastes than the central banking system represented by the canon. Of course it is as impossible to have a world free of the canon as it is to have a world in which everyone agrees with the canon - but it is possible for intelligent adults, once they’ve got away from the ‘starter kit’ use of it, to avoid using the canon to back up their arguments about musical value, I think.

As for the thing about personal taste, I dont think it’s a mystical argument. The canon does not have to back itself up - it is an abstract, as you say. This means that a referral to the canon is shifting the terms of an argument into the abstract, where I don’t think it should go - it’s a cop-out if you like. Complaining about the canon is also dumb on these terms, of course, like complaining about the top 40 - nobody actually likes the entire canon or the entire top 40.

Tom (via 67752)

tomewing:

I’d have to think about how much of this I still agree with, but blimey I was lucid before I had kids.

This is great. I suspect canons are necessary evils in that they need to exist for a form of music to have an awareness of itself, but once that has happened, they should be disdained as quickly as possible.

Like the auteur theory; it was useful in that it got people to treat film as serious art, but once that had taken hold it was necessary to junk the theory as the rather meaningless idea it was.


Inception Ripped-Off Scrooge McDuck & the Beagle Boys!
I’m very disappointed that I haven’t seen this floating round Tumblr yet.

Inception Ripped-Off Scrooge McDuck & the Beagle Boys!

I’m very disappointed that I haven’t seen this floating round Tumblr yet.

3
Aug 04

A Batman question.

We’ve said before that I’m not a comic books guy, but I’ve loved a Batman movie, and, I suppose, enjoyed two of them. Also, I’ve read The Dark Knight Returns.

And if I think about Batman long enough — just to show how much of a nerd I am — I always start to think; yeah, well, you know who he wouldn’t stand a chance against?

Marlo Stanfield.

Like, freal. What’s Bruce Wayne going to do, heavy the corner boys? Ask them who they report to? You snitch to Batman I’m pretty sure you’ve got Snoop and Chris Partlow paying you a visit. And if Omar couldn’t take out Marlo I’m pretty sure Batman couldn’t.

Batman might terrify Gotham, but he’d be wildly ineffective in Baltimore.

Really, this post is more about me being a liberal than it is about me being a nerd.


Until mankind is peaceful enough not to have violence on the news, there’s no point in taking it out of shows that need it for entertainment value.

Cher Horowitz, Clueless (1995)

This is probably the smartest thing that’s ever been said in a ’90s teen comedy. And I’m pretty sure loads of smart things have been said in ’90s teen comedies.

(It also applies to music as well.)



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