Posts tagged "Mad Men"

All Mad Men are created equal: Glenn Beck’s common sense

I’ll say this for cable news programs: they really know how to up the ante. Comedy Central’s Jon Stewart pricked the absurdity of the relentless and frequently meaningless 24 hour news cycle, but he couldn’t match Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly. Then Stewart launched protégé Stephen Colbert and his wicked parody of the rabble-rousing, self-satisfied conservative anchorman, and the game seemed over. How could you top a man who accused reality of having a well-known liberal bias?

Why, with Glenn Beck, of course! A year ago, Beck was… [read more]

Didn’t get around to linking to this one… Me at the USSC blog on Glenn Beck, “Mad Men” and American nostalgia.


Ladies get this, mostly, but it’s a new thing for guys. While women are, of necessity, more adept at coexisting with unrealistic romantic ideals, dudes are just getting used to it, and it’s confusing, especially if you try to take the fantasy literally (as we tend to do).

(via gunstreetgirl, crabcakes:












I was raised by a single mother. I think the definition of a man’s man has shifted in recent times to this sort of fratty bro, different from the older version, which was aloof and distant—Gary Cooper or Cary Grant or James Bond. Now it’s a little vulgar, kind of lowbrow, adolescent. I’m not that guy. Part of being an adult is treating women like women.
Jon Hamm, W Magazine

"Part of being an adult is treating women like women": really, what does that mean? 

Let me tell ya something. Nowadays, everybody’s gotta go to shrinks, and counselors, and go on Sally Jesse Raphael and talk about their problems. What happened to Gary Cooper? The strong, silent type. That was an American. He wasn’t in touch with his feelings. He just did what he had to do. See, what they didn’t know was once they got Gary Cooper in touch with his feelings that they wouldn’t be able to shut him up! And then it’s dysfunction this, and dysfunction that, and dysfunction ma fungule!
Tony Soprano, “The Sopranos”

Jus sayn.

(via gunstreetgirlcrabcakes:

I was raised by a single mother. I think the definition of a man’s man has shifted in recent times to this sort of fratty bro, different from the older version, which was aloof and distant—Gary Cooper or Cary Grant or James Bond. Now it’s a little vulgar, kind of lowbrow, adolescent. I’m not that guy. Part of being an adult is treating women like women.

Jon Hamm, W Magazine

"Part of being an adult is treating women like women": really, what does that mean

Let me tell ya something. Nowadays, everybody’s gotta go to shrinks, and counselors, and go on Sally Jesse Raphael and talk about their problems. What happened to Gary Cooper? The strong, silent type. That was an American. He wasn’t in touch with his feelings. He just did what he had to do. See, what they didn’t know was once they got Gary Cooper in touch with his feelings that they wouldn’t be able to shut him up! And then it’s dysfunction this, and dysfunction that, and dysfunction ma fungule!

Tony Soprano, “The Sopranos”

Jus sayn.


Is this Erin at a music festival in the ’00s or Don Draper with some Beatniks in the ’50s?

naysayersspeak:

Perhaps I’m being idealistic, but didn’t there used to be a political and social justice element to counter-culture? Now it just seems that it’s a bunch of selfish morons, dressing weirdly in an attempt to find the attention they so crave, and mistaking liking obscure music with being interesting. They are as dull and generic as any other group, but worse because they think they are better.


Me at the USSC.

It’s been a while since I’ve pimped my other blog here. Go read me saying lots of insightful stuff about America:


Pictured: Peggy on tonight’s episode of “Mad Men”

Pictured: Peggy on tonight’s episode of “Mad Men”


People tell you who they are, but we ignore it because we want them to be who we want them to be.

Don Draper, “Mad Men,” Ep. 04.08, The Summer Man

I don’t know if that’s true or anything, but it’s gnomic and sounds considered and insightful, and those are the necessary qualities for putting a quote on Tumblr, right?


So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (1925)

(via petecampbellsbitchface, routinemalaise)
Me on Twitter an hour ago:

Oh my god Pete Campbell and your shit eating grin. #MadMen

(via petecampbellsbitchfaceroutinemalaise)

Me on Twitter an hour ago:

Oh my god Pete Campbell and your shit eating grin. #MadMen


And I think it’s telling that these days it actually makes me sad when I hear about a book I love being adapted for the big screen—television as done by HBO, Showtime, and the BBC is where it’s at in terms of drama nowadays.

Matt Yglesias, “The Man in the High Castle,” Think Progress, October 14, 2010

Ugh. This is just Anglophilia, nothing else. Look, the BBC has been responsible for some excellent programming, and even in recent years, it’s produced “The Office” and “Extras,” both of which are worthy of being spoken about as being among the zenith of contemporary television. But talking about the channel in the same breath as modern day HBO? That’s just ridiculous. The BBC isn’t coming with “The Wire” or “The Sopranos” or even “True Blood,” really; it’s not even on AMC’s level now that has “Mad Men.” Even in terms of more populist drama, the BBC hasn’t been able to match the cream of 21st century American television. (I’m talking “Gossip Girl,” “The O.C.,” “Gilmore Girls,” etc.) And where HBO shows are concerned at least, the Poms agree with me.

This shouldn’t be a surprise. America has a great advantage where culture industries are concerned. It has a massive population, a lot of money and the ability to wield economies of scale in a highly effective way. They’re an educated people with a rich history of combining the innovative with the popular. It’s no surprise that they’re responsible for the best television around.



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