Posts tagged "ATL"

The Urban Dictionary Guide to America: Georgia

Georgia

Georgia is a US state and a country in Europe. I doubt any of you came on here to get a definition of the country. Anyways Georgia the state is a kick ass state ! I love living here. We have alot of culture, tasty food and all. Like most of the southern states, its like warm most of the time. We also donated alot of stuff to the music industry. Especially in the Hip Hop/ R & B genres. Atlanta is the state capital and one of the best places to live in the south.

Where are you from ?

Georgia, baby.


tumblinerb:

dominickbrady:

Atlanta by Michael Schmelling – a book of photographs about the hip hop scene in Atlanta, Georgia – will be published on November 1, 2010 by Chronicle Books. Text by Kelefa Sanneh, Interviews by Will Welch. Designed by Rodrigo Corral Design and Michael Schmelling. 8.5 x 10, Hardcover With Jacket, 224 Pages, 200 Color and Black And White Photographs. ISBN #0811872777. Pre orders available at Chronicle Books or Amazon.

Always happy to see Kelefa Sanneh writing about hip hop.

"Text by Kelefa Sanneh" are four of the greatest words that can be attached to anything, but particularly a book, particularly a book about music, and particularly a book about hip hop.

tumblinerb:

dominickbrady:

Atlanta by Michael Schmelling – a book of photographs about the hip hop scene in Atlanta, Georgia – will be published on November 1, 2010 by Chronicle Books. Text by Kelefa Sanneh, Interviews by Will Welch. Designed by Rodrigo Corral Design and Michael Schmelling. 8.5 x 10, Hardcover With Jacket, 224 Pages, 200 Color and Black And White Photographs. ISBN #0811872777. Pre orders available at Chronicle Books or Amazon.

Always happy to see Kelefa Sanneh writing about hip hop.

"Text by Kelefa Sanneh" are four of the greatest words that can be attached to anything, but particularly a book, particularly a book about music, and particularly a book about hip hop.


The Sixth Congressional District, which stretches from the suburbs south of Atlanta into rural west Georgia, fits Gingrich perfectly: It is booming, middle class, and economically revolves around the high-tech Atlanta airport, which vies with Chicago’s O’Hare as the world’s busiest. This is the New South, where spanking new highways crisscross the countryside, shopping centers seem to sprout up overnight, and the sparkle of new restaurants, new businesses and new homes is everywhere. This is the future.
David Osborne, “Newt Gingrich: Shining Knight of the Post-Reagan Right,” Mother Jones, November 1, 1984

Mr. Collipark ft. Ying Yang Twins & DJ Kool - Let the Beat Hit (Can I Please Have the Club Back Please, 2011)

dalatu:

After crunk’s popularity started to wan, Atlanta started to get swept up by Swag Rap; while having its own particular brand of energy, the raw dance floor soul running through a song like “Salt Shaker” was lost in the auto-tune hooks and low-budget synths that has populated songs from Roscoe Dash, Travis Porter, and Yung LA.

  1. This song ain’t bad
  2. "Salt Shaker" and crunk were great, but, damn, remember when all that shit was meant to be the foul nadir of ignant rap or something? Now it’s the good old days!
30 plays

The twelve-lane Connector plows through Atlanta like the Nile of pavement. Along its fenced banks lie the majority of the city’s attractions. Turner buildings, blossoming with neon network logos, lure Yellowjacket grads from the adjacent campus cluster with the sweet nectar of Powerpuff Girls money. Across the way, The Varsity serves grease between buns, communicating with an enigmatic fast food lexicon that rivals rhyming Cockneys. Tourists walk the overpass to the ghostly Olympic park, built on the graveyard of Techwood projects, in the shadows of Vick’s pastel dome. Hipsters and reluctant yuppies settle in the gentrified Five Points and Cabbagetown, giving their quaint subdivisions more verdant “___________ Park” monikers. And finally, there’s Turner Field, reverberating collective October sighs, before the highway splits back into its tributaries in East Point, the cultural fountainhead. The hip-hop id to New York’s ego: the home of Outkast.

[…]

Here, on the resulting Speakerboxxx/The Love Below, the two wander down the blacktop from East Point, each plotting their own distinct course: Andre, like I-85, shoots off to the airport and sky-high trips before dipping into the Mardi Gras marshes of New Orleans, while Big Boi rolls deep down I-75 into south Florida, home of booty bass and baby blue.

Brent DiCrescenzo, “Outkast - Speakerboxxx/The Love Below,” Pitchfork, September 22, 2003

Daniel Silver and Ian Swain, “Urban Economies: Atlanta, the Rap and R&B Capital of the World,” Music & The Entertainment Economy, March 25, 2010:

A preliminary analysis of our 2007 MySpace dataset shows the MSAs whose Hip Hop and Rap bands have captured the most fans on myspace.com. Atlanta’s urban artists and groups have the third-most fans in the country – 6.4 million – behind only Los Angeles and New York. This is roughly 7.5% of the 83.7 million fans of the two MySpace genres, which, incidentally, are the most popular genres on MySpace. Atlanta also ranks highly on a number of other smaller genres: third in R&B, third in Christian Music, second in Crunk, and third in Hardcore (this last figure may reflect many “hardcore” rap artists, but Atlanta also has a sizeable number of “metal” bands who have amassed roughly 340,000 myspace fans, and there are also reports of an emerging hardcore punk scene.  We’d love to hear more about it).
Atlanta is an elite producer of one of America’s most widely consumed cultural products: radio-friendly rap and R&B.  Atlanta is indeed a skilled city.  But it is doubtful that the proportion of four-year college graduates is much of an indicator of the songwriting, arranging, and performance skills that some of Atlanta’s most successful entrepreneurs practice at world-class levels.
At the same time, while much of Atlanta’s musical output emphasizes rap’s traditional ghetto themes, it neglects to mention the emergence of a highly skilled and educated workforce in the city. In fact, we posit that it is likely the combination of these less (formally) educated rappers and producers with better-educated MBAs, lawyers, media professionals, and managers that has positioned Atlanta to so successfully turn its musicians’ creative production into a profitable product across the United States and around the world. Skills and “skillz” are complementary.

Daniel Silver and Ian Swain, “Urban Economies: Atlanta, the Rap and R&B Capital of the World,” Music & The Entertainment Economy, March 25, 2010:

A preliminary analysis of our 2007 MySpace dataset shows the MSAs whose Hip Hop and Rap bands have captured the most fans on myspace.com. Atlanta’s urban artists and groups have the third-most fans in the country – 6.4 million – behind only Los Angeles and New York. This is roughly 7.5% of the 83.7 million fans of the two MySpace genres, which, incidentally, are the most popular genres on MySpace. Atlanta also ranks highly on a number of other smaller genres: third in R&B, third in Christian Music, second in Crunk, and third in Hardcore (this last figure may reflect many “hardcore” rap artists, but Atlanta also has a sizeable number of “metal” bands who have amassed roughly 340,000 myspace fans, and there are also reports of an emerging hardcore punk scene.  We’d love to hear more about it).

Atlanta is an elite producer of one of America’s most widely consumed cultural products: radio-friendly rap and R&B.  Atlanta is indeed a skilled city.  But it is doubtful that the proportion of four-year college graduates is much of an indicator of the songwriting, arranging, and performance skills that some of Atlanta’s most successful entrepreneurs practice at world-class levels.

At the same time, while much of Atlanta’s musical output emphasizes rap’s traditional ghetto themes, it neglects to mention the emergence of a highly skilled and educated workforce in the city. In fact, we posit that it is likely the combination of these less (formally) educated rappers and producers with better-educated MBAs, lawyers, media professionals, and managers that has positioned Atlanta to so successfully turn its musicians’ creative production into a profitable product across the United States and around the world. Skills and “skillz” are complementary.


Magic City, Blue Flame, Cheetah, Diamonds of Atlanta, Follies: the way some cities are known for their restaurants or their museums or their turn-of-the-century architecture, Atlanta’s landmarks are strip clubs. In the way that people in Los Angeles or Miami might ask you if you’ve visited the beach, in Atlanta, you’re asked if you’ve seen any strippers.

Jon Caramanica, “Business and Pleasure,” The New York Times, September 5, 2012

I’m rather skeptical of this claim, though I’ve never been to ATL so what do I know? The city’s rappers — the article’s other subject — certainly seem to endorse Caramanica’s contention though.

And in Atlanta more than in any other city, hip-hop culture overlaps heavily with this world. The strip club is where new music is tested out, where stars go to be seen or to relax, where the value of a song can be measured by the number of dollars that fly skyward when it plays.


While the last decade has seen several hip-hop superstars come out of Atlanta — T.I., Young Jeezy, Ludacris — it’s also fostered more than its share of club-friendly onetime crossover wonders like Dem Franchise Boyz or Shop Boyz. Acts like these “were making songs to try to get played at Crucial and the Poole Palace, and they ended up on Billboard,” said DJ Drama, a mixtape D.J. who’s a fixture in Atlanta’s rap world. When success caught them unprepared, they fizzled.

Jon Caramanica, “Business and Pleasure,” The New York Times, September 5, 2012

Also:

I was in Atlanta for a week and never heard of that…

Evidently you don’t get strip club tips unless you’ve been in the city for at least a fortnight.


Eat your lil ass up like a Chanterelle’s plate.
This is part one of two in a series of me visiting soul food restaurants referenced by Southern musical acts.

Eat your lil ass up like a Chanterelle’s plate.

This is part one of two in a series of me visiting soul food restaurants referenced by Southern musical acts.


In the meantime, Green clamped down on all lawlessness, even banning cross burnings for a while, lest they be charged with violating local fire ordinances. Instead, he kept his men busy with improbable public relations stunts. Food was distributed to the needy and twenty pairs of long johns, stamped “K.K.K.,” showed up at an old folks’ home. In the most memorable act, a Klansman donned a Santa Claus outfit — over his white robe and hood — and presented a 107-year-old black man with a brand new radio.

Kevin M. Cruse, White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (2005)

Worst. Christmas. Ever.

Incidentally, this is in 1947, meaning said black man had already lived through 25 years of slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow.

Also:

The leaks came from Stetson Kennedy, an enterprising writer who had infiltrated the Klan and delighted in airing its dirty laundry. In a particularly inspired move, he contacted the scriptwriters of the Superman radio serial and gave them detailed descriptions of Klan ceremonies, right down to the passwords. Atlanta Klansmen soon found their own children imitating the episodes, fighting over who got to be Superman and who had to be the cowardly Klansmen.

Awesome.

I totally want to see this book adapted into a Mad Men–meets–The Wire 1940s Atlanta TV drama.