Posts tagged "'90s"


While the 1980’s will always be remembered as the decade of fashion’s gluttonous downfall, gilt leading to guilt, 90’s fashion is shaping up to be about a decadence of an entirely different kind. It may well be remembered as the decade when fashion served as a pusher — a pusher of what appear to be the best-dressed heroin addicts in history.
Other fashion references have faded away, be they punk, mainline Philadelphia or monastic austerity. The heroin-addict look, evolving from grunge to the waif to its latest manifestation, has had the tenacity in fashion of, well, an addiction.
Despite fashion’s habit of moving on once a look goes mainstream, the heroin-addict esthetic is the look that just won’t go away. It’s on runways and in magazines, most recently featuring messy knotted hair and the clammy skin that William Mullen, the creative director of Details magazine, calls “junkie sweats.” It has replaced the outdated model’s hauteur, which comes from imposing beauty, with the contemporary vision of detachment.

-Amy M. Spindler, “The ’90s Version of the Decadent Look,” The New York Times, May 7, 1996

While the 1980’s will always be remembered as the decade of fashion’s gluttonous downfall, gilt leading to guilt, 90’s fashion is shaping up to be about a decadence of an entirely different kind. It may well be remembered as the decade when fashion served as a pusher — a pusher of what appear to be the best-dressed heroin addicts in history.

Other fashion references have faded away, be they punk, mainline Philadelphia or monastic austerity. The heroin-addict look, evolving from grunge to the waif to its latest manifestation, has had the tenacity in fashion of, well, an addiction.

Despite fashion’s habit of moving on once a look goes mainstream, the heroin-addict esthetic is the look that just won’t go away. It’s on runways and in magazines, most recently featuring messy knotted hair and the clammy skin that William Mullen, the creative director of Details magazine, calls “junkie sweats.” It has replaced the outdated model’s hauteur, which comes from imposing beauty, with the contemporary vision of detachment.

-Amy M. Spindler, “The ’90s Version of the Decadent Look,” The New York Times, May 7, 1996

Mar 27

February 23rd, 1999: Eminem releases “My Name Is,” which goes on to become the first rap single to go to #1 on the TRL charts. April 20th, 1999: Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris kill 13 people at Columbine High School. No musician has ever had nine weeks of such monumental career damage, without actually doing anything themselves, as Marilyn Manson suffered there. The boy Mathers snatched his crown as the number one folk devil in mainstream culture, then the Trenchcoat Mafia forced him into perhaps the most embarrassingly emasculating step-downs in musical history (which itself was followed up by three long painful years wherein Big Bri tried to prove to us that he’d read a book once in a series of “intelligent” “interviews” “outlining” his “considered” “position”).
Dom Passantino, “Marilyn Manson - Eat Me, Drink Me (Review),” Stylus Magazine, June 14 2007

Listeria: Ten Moments When Eminem’s Reign Was Officially Over

Those four horsemen…

It’s a little imperfect calling Eminem, Blink-182, American Pie, and “South Park” the four horsemen of the Clinton-era apocalypse; after all, Em was still an icon until Election Day 2004 (remember that one week in which “Mosh” seemed significant?) and Blink-182 endured til 2003, albeit with an album that wasn’t Blink-182 as we had known them. And South Park continues today, of course.

But I like the construction not only because of the similarities the four share, but the way they themselves cross-bred creatively. Blink appeared in American Pie and covered songs from South Park in concert. Em’s mimesis included his version of South Park’s take on Saddam Hussein. His feuds with boy bands paralleled Blink’s parodic “All the Small Things” video. These cultural forms seemed to act not always collaboratively, but frequently in concert.


karaj:

i love that the dude who posted these awesome emp photos on his flickr page used the caption “kara jesella and marisa meltzer girling.” i think he is exactly right and i am starting using the word “girling” right now.

I went to this. Afterwards, Theon and I agreed that it was good. “But,” Theon said, “They were all cool girls.” What were the ’90s like for girls who weren’t cool enough to be listening to riot grrl, he wanted to know.

One great feature of the presentation was the Tumblr feed displayed behind them. One less great feature is that that Tumblr is locked; I went home afterwards wanting to revisit some of the material, and was unable to. No rock ‘n’ roll fun.


U2 - Zooropa (Zooropa, 1993)

As the Eurozone teeters on the brink of collapse, let’s cast our minds back to its glorious birth. A Europe freshly and jubilantly sewn back together after the sudden collapse of the iron curtain entered the ’90s with a sense of End of History optimism. Vorsprung durch technik, as the mantra of the times went and as these ambassadors of the then-nascent Celtic Tiger sang.

The cover of U2’s playful, satisfyingly tossed-off 1993 album Zooropa depicts a cartoon baby surrounded by the stars of the European Union flag over a background of digital noise. The title and opening track launches with a parody of the Brian Eno-steered slow build of hits like “Where the Streets Have No Name”; Reagan-era, stadium-sized ethereal Americana transformed into burbling, post-reunification electronics. “Zooropa” is the song of ’90s Europe the way “99 Luftballons” was the song of the continent’s ’80s counterpart.

U2 has always had a keen grasp of the zeitgeist; or they did. They’ve foundered over the past decade, and the last time they really captured the public mood was when their vague millennial uplift was repurposed as a mass salve for the wounds of 9/11. But until then they’d had a keen sense for the public mood: the nuclear paranoia of the War-era early ’80s, for instance, or Achtung Baby's embrace of the irony that would become a ’90s cliche. Even the confused, eclectic Pop awkwardly complemented the prosperous, emotionally disconnected end of the century.

"Zooropa" was a song for a new Europe; gleaming, optimistic and cheeky. "Be a winner!" it urged. "Eat to get slimmer!" You could have it all! Released mere months before the Maastricht treaty, the agreement that would lead to the creation of the EU, went into effect, “Zooropa” is the sound of all the hope that’s come undone in Greece, in Ireland, Portugal and Italy and Spain over the past few years.

20 plays


Hey, 1990s. I’ve got a question.
What the fuck was this about? I mean… seriously?

Hey, 1990s. I’ve got a question.

What the fuck was this about? I mean… seriously?


Nineteen-Nineties, I totally endorse this, however. Twenty-Tens, I don’t see your Justin Biebers and your Lady GaGas coming up with shit like this.

Jun 13

Top 5 Things About “MMMBop.” (MMMBop, 1996)

01. Don’t front.
02. Zac and Taylor look like they’re just messing around having a good time, but with Isaac it’s like, dude, don’t you want to hang out with some grown-ups?
03. See that house? Clinton-era prosperity gave that to rednecks in Oklahoma without involving sub-prime mortgages.
04. 1996 was easily the most ’90s year of the ’90s. (2003 was the most ’00s year of the ’00s.)
05. Who had the better white boy corn-rows: Dexter Holland or Zac Hanson?



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