“Just trying to be like George Washington" 
!!!!!!!
(Taylor “This morning I bought books about John Adams, Lincoln’s Cabinet, the Founding Fathers and Ellis Island" Swift aka epic history nerd.)

I don't like when progressives say "stay away" from conservative states or that those states should secede or be kicked out of the country or whatever.

After the revolution...

Oh my god you guys, the new Madoka movie is so amazingly good; it’s even prettier than the TV show and there are so many cool parts that I won’t talk about because SPOILERS. Except to say that it starts out with Madoka, Homura, Mami, Kyouko, and Sayaka all being bad-ass mahou shoujo together with neat, overly elaborate transformation sequences and cool fighting styles like this was just your everyday magical girl series. And you know it can’t last and the movie is going to take you to strange and horrible places, but at the beginning everything is so great and perfect and you want them to stay like that always.


Was reading the AV Club's The Simpsons classic recap of “Bart Sells His Soul,” and thinking about the dream sequence where all the kids and the corporeal manifestations of their souls row across the lake. And then I decided that if Bart gets a soul, so too should I, so here’s me and my soul. My soul’s like a toy that neeeever breaks!
By the way, pls note my Seahawks-inspired Super Bowl outfit for work today. (The one I’m wearing, not my soul.)

Was reading the AV Club's The Simpsons classic recap of “Bart Sells His Soul,” and thinking about the dream sequence where all the kids and the corporeal manifestations of their souls row across the lake. And then I decided that if Bart gets a soul, so too should I, so here’s me and my soul. My soul’s like a toy that neeeever breaks!

By the way, pls note my Seahawks-inspired Super Bowl outfit for work today. (The one I’m wearing, not my soul.)


But the larger issue here is simply that the letter is extraordinarily stupid. Its author, successful as he was in business, was still perfectly capable of writing an extremely stupid letter to the editor. The political and historical analysis contained in the letter is stupid. But beyond that, the idea of publishing it was stupid. Anyone with the slightest sense of public opinion would recognize that the analogy is offensive and counterproductive. There is simply no viewpoint on economics or American politics from which writing this letter was anything other than stupid. And yet Tom Perkins, a very successful businessman and co-founder of one of the most important VC firms in the world, went and wrote it anyway.

Concurrently with the publication of the Perkins letter, a fair swathe of the world’s elite was gathered in Davos, Switzerland, for a conference based on the presumption that a Tom Perkins would never write a stupid letter. The presumption of the annual World Economic Forum meeting is that leading policymakers and scholars ought to mingle with very, very, very rich businessmen (and, yes, it’s overwhelmingly men) to talk about the leading issues of the day. The idea, in other words, is that CEOs and major investors have unique and important insights on pressing public policy issues. After all, they’re so rich! How could they not be smart?

Matt Yglesias, “Stop Listening to Rich People,” Slate, January 28, 2014

The letter in question is one that compares criticism of America’s wealthiest to Kristallnacht. Continues Yglesias:

Of course, if there were just one somewhat obnoxious conference like Davos, it wouldn’t be a big deal. But the Davos mentality—the assumption that managing a for-profit enterprise gives you special insight into social ills—is all around us, from the Aspen Ideas Festival on down. It has also infested more formalized policymaking settings. Rich businesspeople wield disproportionate interest in the political system simply through their ability to make campaign contributions and hire lobbyists. But over and beyond that, they are regularly invited to enter policymaking circles.

I mean, yes. Right? Even in a US in which public opinion is turning against the one per cent, it’s hard to shake the idea that the rich are, at some level, worth listening to. Part of this is that, even when they say dumb things — which they have just as much of a propensity to do as the rest of the population — they know how to use the language of public debate. But it’s also that the notion of meritocracy is so ingrained in society that its logic now flows in the opposite direction; not she can be successful because she is smart, but he must be smart because he is successful. Successful means rich, natch.

That ain’t make no sense. Rich people are morons, mostly. They’re talented at making money, but apart from that, they don’t know shit. You wouldn’t believe the idiocy I’ve heard come from the mouths of the wealthy, and I don’t mean clueless idiocy of the privileged, but just your regular run-of-the-mill type ignorance. And yet we still think rich folks are worth listening to because they’ve piled some commas together.

A particular, related bugbear of mine is how we’re supposed to all be so persuaded that when it comes to disreputable prejudices, the wealthy are somehow inured. Like we’re supposed to imagine that the real unreconstructed racists in the Republican Party are the working class, the hicks, but never the money-men. Naw, money doesn’t stop you being racist. It might buy you the nous to not say certain words in certain public settings, but just like smarts, the well-off don’t have any special claim to morals either.

Stop listening to rich people!


politico:

Did you catch the #SOTU? Our cartoonist Matt Wuerker’s interpretation.

How does he keep up with the news like that?

politico:

Did you catch the #SOTU? Our cartoonist Matt Wuerker’s interpretation.

How does he keep up with the news like that?


“We live in cities you’ll never see on screen”: On Lorde and growing up on the periphery

Do you reckon Macklemore has Kendrick listed in his phone as “Kendrick Real” because the first time he asked K.Dot for his digits, Lamar gave him a fake number? “Uh, yeah man, I’m on 555…”

Do you reckon Macklemore has Kendrick listed in his phone as “Kendrick Real” because the first time he asked K.Dot for his digits, Lamar gave him a fake number? “Uh, yeah man, I’m on 555…”


thesinglesjukebox:

VANCE JOY - RIPTIDE
[3.45]


Just wait — in a hundred years, process servers will be known as “process Mumforders”…

Jonathan Bradley: I’m reminded of the former Australian prime minister Robert Menzies dreaming up his own constituency in 1942, one he described as “the forgotten people” in a kind of “silent majority” moment a whole generation before Nixon came along. Menzies concerned himself with “salary-earners, shopkeepers, skilled artisans, professional men and women, farmers, and so on,” mostly because he couldn’t believe anyone could give a shit about the working class without being a communist. “They are for the most part unorganised and unselfconscious,” spake the PM. “They are not rich enough to have individual power. They are taken for granted by each political party in turn. They are not sufficiently lacking in individualism to be organised for what in these days we call ‘pressure politics.’ And yet, as I have said, they are the backbone of the nation.” Within this great self-pitying mushy Australian middle, feted for its frugality and modesty, Menzies saw a dynamo. I hear Vance Joy.
[3]

[Read, comment and vote on The Singles Jukebox ]

Not gonna act like I’m making any great point here, but I didn’t really want to spend my blurb complaining yet again about the fetishization of earthiness, and it wasn’t like I could recycle my "Magic" review. Rewarding mediocrity; this shares in common with Imagine Dragons my knowledge that I’ve listened to singles from both acts many, many times, but can never remember how either one goes. 

I probably got it most right on Twitter yesterday though:



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